Arkansas Wildlife Federation
 

Legislation

Posted by | Sep. 7, 2011 | Global Warming

Legislation and Global Warming

Currently the U.S doesn’t regulate carbon emissions on the basis that it is not classified as a pollutant. Despite the number of developed nations who have signed on to the Kyoto protocol, the current administration is sticking to the argument that it will destroy the economy.  However, global warming potentially poses the greatest risk human health the world has ever seen. Right now there is legislation being drafted known as the Climate Stewardship Act. This act seeks to regulate carbon emissions through a system of cap and trade, where C02 emitters can buy carbon credits to meet regulations on carbon.  For more information about the climate stewardship act go here (link to PDF “summary and facts”). To view the top ten reasons to support the act go here (link to PDF “top 10”).

Arkansas Groups Involved in Global Warming

The following conservation organizations in Arkansas have been very active in our mutual commitment to reduce global warming. They are:

Ken Smith kensmith@audubon.org.
Executive Director
Audubon Arkansas
1423B South Main St.
Little Rock, AR 72201
501) 244-2229

Glenn Hooks glen.hooks@sierraclub.org
Director
Sierra Club of Arkansas
1308 West 2nd Street
Little Rock, AR 72201
(501-301-8280)

Don Richardson  dsrenviro@gmail.com
Director
Arkansas Climate Awareness Project 501-592-1391

Robert McClarty robert@themarkhamgroup.net
Pew Environmental Group
The Markham Group
823 W Markham St # 202
Little Rock, AR 72201
501-324-6000

Rob Fisher fisher@ecoconservation.org
Executive Director and Co-Founder
Ecological Conservation Organization (ECO)
120 S. Cross St.
Little Rock, AR  72201

Bill Kopsky  bill@arpanel.org
Executive Director
Arkansas Public Policy Panel
1308 West 2nd Street
Little Rock, Arkansas 72201
Office 501-376-7913    Fax 501-374-3935

Art Hobson ahobson@uark.edu
Physics Professor Emeritus of Physic
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
479-575-5918

Ethan Nahté  arkwf@sbcglobal.net
Creative Director
Arkansas Wildlife Federation
P.O. Box 56380
Little Rock, AR 72215
(501) 888-4770

Arkansas Sportsmen’s Poll

Posted by | | Global Warming

Majority of Sportsmen believe Global Warming is a real concern

Recently a nation wide poll was taken to assess where sportsman stand on the issue of global warming. It was discovered that a majority of sportsman now believe that Global Warming is a cause for concern. To view some of the results of the Nationwide poll go here; To see media coverage of this poll go here.

Resources You Can Use

Posted by | | Global Warming

Many alternative fuels being developed and used today, which for the most part are non-petroleum based, will be part of the solution to lowering our fossil fuel use.  For in-depth information on alternative fuels such as bio-diesel, and ethanol you can visit the U.S. Dept. of Energy site.


In addition many alternatives exist for the generation of electricity other than fossil fuel burning such as the use of renewable sources of energy:


For more information about renewable energy go here.

The Arkansas energy office maintains a site which contains information about renewable energy resources in Arkansas.

Groups Taking Action

Posted by | | Global Warming

Arkansas groups taking action against global warming

The following conservation organizations in Arkansas have been very active in our mutual commitment to reduce global warming. They are:

Ken Smith
Executive Director
Audubon Arkansas
1423B South Main St.
Little Rock, AR 72201
(501) 244-2229

Glenn Hooks
Associate Regional Representative
Sierra Club of Arkansas
1308 West 2nd Street
Little Rock, AR 72201
(501) 301-8280

Don Richardson
Director
Arkansas Climate Awareness Project
(501) 592-1391

Robert McClarty robert@themarkhamgroup.net
Pew Environmental Group
The Markham Group
823 W Markham St # 202
Little Rock, AR 72201
(501) 324-6000

Rob Fisher
Executive Director and Co-Founder
Ecological Conservation Organization (ECO)
120 S. Cross St.
Little Rock, AR  72201

Bill Kopsky 
Executive Director
Arkansas Public Policy Panel
1308 West 2nd Street
Little Rock, Arkansas 72201
(501) 376-7913; Fax (501) 374-3935

Art Hobson
Physics Professor Emeritus of Physics
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
(479) 575-5918

Ethan Nahté
Executive Director
Arkansas Wildlife Federation
9108 Rodney Parham Road, Suite 101
Little Rock, AR 72205
(501) 224-9200

Solutions

Posted by | | Global Warming

Many viable alternatives and solutions exist to our excessive fossil fuel consumption patterns.  An effort on the part of U.S conference of mayors, which is a group of mayors from major U.S cities, passed a resolution recognizing global warming and setting the goal of reducing emissions inline with Koyoto levels (7% below 1990 levels by 2012) in their municipalities.  Currently there are 255 signatories to this agreement including four Arkansas mayors. To view information aobut the Kyoto levels click here. A group of citizens can help push their mayors into signing this environmentally beneficial resolution for their city.

In addition there are many simple things individuals can do to lower energy consumption and slow the onset of global warming. This includes recycling, the use of public transportation, the use of renewable energy including solar and wind, buying locally, short showers versus long baths, and turning out the lights to name a few. Until CO2 emissions are regulated in this country an individual can take many steps to lower their own carbon footprint. If you are curious about how heavy your carbon footprint (CO2) measures up, you can check it at this page.

Furthermore there are solutions such as carbon sequestration; which is the removal of carbon from the atmosphere and feeding it to soils, forests, oceans, and other natural cycles, are becoming an option for the management of carbon in the atmosphere.To learn more about carbon sequestration go here.

In the end, lowering fossil fuel use will likely come from a combination of alternative technologies and practicing energy conservation and conscious consumption in our daily lives.

Legislation and Global Warming
Currently the U.S doesn’t regulate carbon emissions on the basis that it is not classified as a pollutant. Despite the number of developed nations who have signed on to the Kyoto protocol, the current administration is sticking to the argument that it will destroy the economy. However, global warming potentially poses the greatest risk human health the world has ever seen. Right now there is legislation being drafted known as the Climate Stewardship Act. This act seeks to regulate carbon emissions through a system of cap and trade, where C02 emitters can buy carbon credits to meet regulations on carbon. For more information about the climate stewardship act visit the UNFCC site or NRDC site. To view FAQ (frequently asked questions)to support the act visit the NRDC FAQ page. To view the Kyoto Protocol in laymans terms you can click here.

Wildlife Impacts

Posted by | | Global Warming

Some organisms are dependent on certain climatic conditions (i.e. spring dates, frost dates, precipitation, temperature, etc.) to trigger life history events. Many other organisms are dependant on these organisms for survival. As these environmental conditions change, the timing of many life history events in animals change, putting into question the preservation of these relationships in nature. Some organisms will adjust and survive but many more vulnerable species may perish as these delicate ecological relationships are altered.

Global warming has already been shown to have adverse effects on wildlife, including a migration to higher latitudes and a northward shift of home ranges An analysis of many scientific articles was compiled into a larger report  and a majority of the findings were shown to be consistent with global warming predictions for organisms. In addition, the Parmesan report which outlines current global warming impacts on community and ecosystem change can be viewed here.

Global Warming, Arkansas Sportsman, and Game Species

Increasingly sportsman and hunters have become more and more aware about the effects of global warming on their particular game species.  In Arkansas 77% of hunters and anglers agree global warming is currently occurring, and 74% agree global warming is a threat to the state economy because it depends upon income from natural resources, such as the timber industry and hunting and fishing.

The blog ontarget global warming  deals with the relationship between global warming and hunters, and has the results of the national sportsman poll on global warming. Also a wealth of information on the potential effects of global warming on game and relevant fish species in Arkansas is addressed on this site.

Duck hunters interested in passing on their sporting traditions to their children and grandchildren should be aware of the potential negative effects that Global Warming can have on their favorite duck species. Also, anglers should be concerned with global warming, and the potential effects it poses to the survival of game species in the many generations to come.  Coldwater fish are particularly vulnerable because they don’t respond well to warming water.  For more information on global warming’s effect on cold water fish go here.

Arkansas Impacts

Posted by | | Global Warming

Global warming is caused when greenhouse gasses accumulate in the atmosphere and force the earth to trap excessive amounts of the sun’s heat, causing the earth to warm.  Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is one of the main greenhouse gasses, but others exist such as methane produced from landfills, and nitrous oxide. C02 is released as a result of the burning of forests and fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and gas in order to create power for transportation, industry, and electricity generation.

The heating of the globe will have catastrophic consequences for humans and the other species that inhabit this earth if nothing is done to change our fossil fuel consumption patterns. Some effects already seen today include, more intense storms (link to “hurricanes and GW PDF fact sheet”) because of warmer ocean waters, loss of substantial amounts of glacier and snow cover at the Polar Regions resulting in sea level rise, ecosystem change as a result of drought and climate changes, and alterations of life history events in organisms.  To read more about current impacts go to the EPA impact site.

Arkansas Impacts
The National Wildlife Federation has created an Arkansas Specific fact sheet that talks about many of the specific consequences wildlife and humans face, as a result of global warming. Solutions for Arkansans are addressed as well.

Aug
23
Sat
4:00 pm AWF Annual Conservation Achievement Awards Banquet @ The Center of Bryant
AWF Annual Conservation Achievem… @ The Center of Bryant
Aug 23 @ 4:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Banquet Flyer 2014 Come help AWF honor and reward those who have gone above and beyond for conservation in Arkansas. Banquet also includes a fresh-coked [...]
Sep
6
Sat
10:00 am AWF Quarterly Meeting @ Witt Stephens Jr. Central Arkansas Nature Center
AWF Quarterly Meeting @ Witt Stephens Jr. Central Arkansas Nature Center
Sep 6 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
The September 2014 meeting marks the beginning of AWF’s fiscal year. Voting for Board positions will occur at this meeting. In addition the agenda will [...]